Meet Lois. 
 The children had been begging for a dog but while I want a dog, I do not want a dog. My youngest is finally in school and the last thing I want is something else to look after. I’ve picked up enough poop, thankyouverymuch.
Enter Lois. Lois was a stray who lived in our yard with her two kittens. A certain child started feeding her, the kids were begging us to make an honest cat out of her, and next thing she knew it, Lois was at the vet and sleeping in a bed. Even though certain people in this house may or may not be allergic to cats, Lois moved in.  
Turns out, the kids are less than pleased with the turn of events. Maybe you should be careful what you wish for. 
“You love her more than us.” 
“She’s your favorite.”
“You never talk to us that way.” 
Wrong. 
Wrong. 
Maybe. I talk to Lois in the same sing-song way I talked to the kids when they were infants — helpless and dependent and grateful for whatever attention I could give them. Because Lois reminds me of them when they loved me unconditionally, when they ate whatever I put in front of them, when they were happy just to see me walk through the door. 
In short, when they liked me. All the time. Before they started yelling at me because I bought the wrong kind of rice. Before they asked me not to speak in front of their friends. (“You may not even make eye contact.”) Before the eye roll. Lois cannot roll her eyes. 
The great Nora Ephron said that it would be wise to get a dog when your children are teenagers because someone will always be happy to see you. 
You could get a dog, or you could get a Lois. 

Posted in parenting on Nov 2, 2016